Campo Grande, July 22, 2017 Change language
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Accepted Short Courses

All short courses will be taught in Portuguese

 

SC 1: Experimental Research on Future Internet: An Approach Using Virtualization and the OpenFlow Framework

Schedule

  • Monday, May 30th, 8:30am to 12:30pm

Abstract

Internet has become a huge worldwide success and is changing the way we interact, work, and have fun. Much of its success is due to the large flexibility of IP technology. Despite all the success of the Internet, IP core technology is the cause of its own limitations, which become increasingly more evident. The main goals of the activities labeled as Future Internet (FI) are the formulation and evaluation of alternative architectures to substitute IP. In this context, two approaches are being discussed and investigated, where the first, called Clean Slate, aims at replacing the current architecture by a new fully rebuilt one, and the second, called Evolutionary, that intends to evolve the current architecture without losing compatibility with the current one. However, the biggest challenge now is where to enable and test the proposed approaches in order to efficiently validate them without sacrificing the current infrastructure, since there will be the need for routers and switches to be reconfigured, and resources to be allocated and monitored. Thus, the network must be as flexible as possible so that this infrastructure allows the coexistence of multiple parallel models. In this sense, virtualization (of network devices, links, etc.) and the OpenFlow solution are becoming the best alternatives to enable multiple experiments of new architectures in a production environment. An OpenFlow network allows programming of network behavior, in addition to creating virtual network environments called slice (Virtual networks with nodes, links and resources) to test new protocol models. This short course will be essentially theoretical and starts by presenting the motivation that is leading professionals and academic community to invest in research to investigate the challenges of the Future Internet. Next, recent experiments carried out for the Future Internet in Brazil and in backbones in Europe, North America, and Asia will be presented. After that, the OpenFlow framework will be detailed, including the main aspects of virtualization. We also describe the requirements for construction of an experimental testbed, including demonstration and details of the mechanisms needed to configure and evaluate such test environment. A case study of creating multiple slices for testing networking protocols will be shown. Finally, future trends will be presented regarding the experimental research and the Future Internet.

Authors

  • Fernando Farias (UFPA)
  • José Maria Dias (UFPA)
  • Sergio Silva (UFPA)
  • João Júlio Salvatti (UFPA)
  • Antônio Abelém (UFPA)
  • Marcos Salvador (CPqD)
  • Michael Stanto (RNP & UFF)

 

SC 2: Exploiting Online Social Networks: From Data Collection and Analysis of Large Datasets to the Applications

Schedule

  • Tuesday, May 31st, 2pm to 6pm

Abstract

Online social networks became extremely popular, causing the appearing and increasing popularity of a new wave of applications on the Web. Associated to this popularity growth, online social networks are becoming a key theme in several research areas. This short course offers an introduction to the researcher that aims at exploring this theme. Initially, we present the main characteristics of current online social network sites. Then, we discuss the main metrics and types of analysis used to study the graphs that represent the social network topologies. Finally, we summarize the main approaches used to collect online social networks and discuss recent work that used these approaches.

Authors

  • Fabrício Benevenuto (UFOP)
  • Jussara Almeida (UFMG)
  • Altigran Soares da Silva (UFAM, UFMG)


SC 3: Web of Things: Connecting Physical Devices to the Digital World

Schedule

  • Wednesday, June 1st, 2pm to 6pm

Abstract

In the near future the number of computing devices connected to the Internet will be massive.  Those devices are smart objects which are becoming part of people´s life and will be quickly found in any place. The Web of Things (WoT) proposal is to integrate smart devices as first-class citizens into the World Wide Web. So, the users will be able to access those physical objects via URLs, to browse them, and to compose the resources provided by such devices into physical mashups. The goal of this short course is to present the state of the art in WoT application development. First, we will provide an overall view of the Internet of Things (IoT) concept and how such concept evolved to forge the Web of Things paradigm. Next, we will present the main projects in the WoT area. Following, we will detail the current underlying architecture employed in WoT projects. Finally, we will present how the resources available in smart devices can be composed in Web applications, called mashups. During the course, practical examples of WoT application development will be shown using the Sun SPOT platform.

Authors

  • Tiago França (UFRJ)
  • Paulo Pires (UFRN)
  • Luci Pirmez (UFRJ)
  • Flavia Delicato (UFRN)
  • Claudio Farias (UFRJ)

 

SC 4: Identity Management in the Future Internet

Schedule

  • Thursday, June 2nd, 8:30am to 12:30pm

Abstract

The Internet as a platform for ubiquitous communication has quickly advanced in the last years. New services have emphasized the limits of the current Internet and motivated the development of the Future Internet. New network architectures are more complex, more distributed and, ideally, more secure. However, as new technologies emerge, new requirements and security issues are highlighted. The Future Internet must support end users, not only to provide access to services, but also to manage their participation in physical-virtual and intelligent environments. End users need to get access to multiple services, in which most of them are set dynamically based on users requirements. Those characteristics emphasize the importance of identity management systems for the Future Internet in order to provide adequate dynamic services in relation to users personal data and requirements. Therefore, this short course presents the state of the art of Identity Management Systems on Future Internet, highlighting the challenges, encryption methods used, specific devices applied, proposed architectures and  future perspectives.

Authors

  • Michele Nogueira (UFPR)
  • Aldri dos Santos (UFPR)
  • Jenny Torres (LIP6, França)
  • Angelita Zanella (IFC)
  • Yuri Danielewicz (UFPR)

 

SC 5: Resource Allocation in Clouds: Concepts, Tools and Research Challenges

Schedule

  • Thursday, June 2nd, 2pm to 6pm

Abstract

Cloud computing is an attractive computing model since it allows provision of resources on demand. Such process of allocation and reallocation of resources is the key to accommodate unpredicted demands and to improve the return of investment on the infrastructure supporting the Cloud. However, despite the recent growth of the Cloud Computing market, several problems on the process of resources allocation remain open. This short course introduces essential concepts and technologies for Cloud Computing and presents some research questions on the area, focusing on the challenges and state-of-the-art solutions for resource allocation.

Authors

  • Glauco Gonçalves (UFPE)
  • Patrícia Endo (UFPE)
  • Thiago Cordeiro (Ericsson Research, Sweden)
  • André Palhares (GPRT)
  • Djamel Sadok (UFPE)
  • Judith Kelner (UFPE)
  • Bob Melander (Ericsson Research, Sweden)
  • Jan-Erik Mângs (Ericsson Research, Sweden)


 

Organization

  • FACOM-UFMS
  • UFMS

Promotion

  • SBC
  • LARC

Official Air Carrier

  • Official Air Carrier